On Jane Austen’s Emma

Here I am, with a brief review of my second book of the year, Emma. If you have been following us you know that we are doing a 20 books for 2020 challenge. Although it has been a slow start we are continuing reading and sharing.

After I read a book, I start to research about it to see what other people think. I was surprised to see that –

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An Autodidact Freedom Searcher – Gorky

For the last couple of years, whenever I gazed over the shelves of the bookcase, this book attracted my attention. Finally I had a chance to read it: True Stories by Maxim Gorky.

Some books are fun and easy to read, while some give a different kind of literary satisfaction. Gorky’s stories are not difficult to read, but they also have that sweet taste of literature. It has been a long time since I read such a literary work and it felt good.

I just finished the book and I wanted to write a post about it. Characters are described quite well, I felt like I already know these people who lived more than a century ago. Some of the stories tell folk stories, some have epic sounds, but all have realistic approach to character descriptions, and they all tell the search for freedom. Many parts have long philosophical parts about freedom, meaning of life, and change in life styles as people move towards cities.

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In this image, two grass-heads accompany the book, True Stories by Maxim Gorky.

One of the parts that loved about this book is the beautiful imagery! Many of the stories have impressive descriptions of sea, wind and the appearance of the characters. Continue reading

Revisiting Children’s Books, Where All is Well

I love making lists. Simply writing everything down, categorized by the title, is always helpful and satisfying. Packing List, Things To Do List, Shopping List… Organization is only one of the reasons I keep lists of things. The other reason is to see and remember. Therefore, I have a list I keep every year: “The Books I Read in the Summer of 2015 (the current year)”.

It has been at least 10 years since I first started. I write the name of the book, the writer and the number of pages. Then I compare the list to last year’s to see how the page numbers or the number of the books changed. I know that the quality of the books is more important than the number of pages or the quantity of the books; but let’s be honest, Continue reading

Not a beach-read, but I am not at a beach, so it is not a problem

Being on a break means reading books for me. Probably it is not only me; bookstores make a corner for books to be read on beach, usually light and fun. Nowadays I am reading W.Somerset Maugham’s Collected Short Stories. It is definitely not a beach-read, but I am not at a beach, so it is not a problem.

Maugham's book I am reading

Maugham’s book I am reading nowadays.

I met Maugham’s stories this year, Continue reading

What Makes Us Buy the Book We Are Holding?

Bookstores and libraries are magical places full of stories. As we wander around and look at the shelves, we see numerous titles and colorful covers. Whispers from each book reach our ears and we choose the book with the loudest whisper, or the one that manages to talk to us. 

How can a book talk to us? Continue reading

Should We Write What We Know or What We Don’t Know?

Writing has so many different aspects. We write to learn about ourselves, to tell people something, to relax, to make people laugh, cry, or to give a sense of belonging. All those reasons mean that we usually write things we know, or at least things we have an idea about. Memoir is the most prominent example where writers use their memories, thoughts and feelings. Not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers may use what they have experienced, and build characters based on people they have or had in their lives.

Mark Twain has a relevant quote; it is clear and simple:

“Write what you know.” ~ Mark Twain

Almost two years ago, Continue reading